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In 2009, 15.5 million children in American - more than 1 in 5 - were poor. (Children's Defense Fund)

Queens Community House

Queens

The Queens Community House is committed to the personal growth of the diverse people it serves and to the creation of self-reliant, open and responsible communities. Established in the settlement house tradition, it embodies the core beliefs that all persons can and want to grow, and that all can contribute.

Campaign for Summer Jobs


United Neighborhood Houses fights for Summer Jobs for young people.

Campaign for Summer JobsThrough the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP), New York businesses and nonprofits provide jobs for thousands of teens each year, occupations like serving as a camp counselor or working in a professional office, retail job or as a museum docent.

Through the Campaign for Summer Jobs, United Neighborhood Houses, along with our co-chair, Neighborhood Family Services Coalition, advocates for funding for SYEP and at the same time provides leadership opportunities for young people.

Visit Campaign for Summer jobs on Facebook!


For over a decade, the Campaign has been successful in building support for tens of thousands of summer jobs. With teen unemployment at an all time high, the Campaign for Summer Jobs becomes even more important today. Budget cuts have reduced SYEP jobs to its lowest level in eleven years.

In New York City, there are over one million youth between the ages of 14 and 21 who are eligible for the Summer Youth Employment Program. The Campaign's goal is to see that every youth who wants a summer job can obtain one. While government funding made it possible for nearly 28,000 young people in New York City to have a summer job in 2011, a record number of approximately 131,000 youth applied.

For further information on the Campaign for Summer Jobs, please contact Kevin Douglas, Policy Analyst. 

Businesses can contact Jessica Ziegler, Director of Development, to find out how to become a summer job sponsor. 

Wisdom from a few of our Youth Advocates:

"I can help my family, and save money for college." Michael, 13

"…Giving us responsibility is important, and sends the message that life is not just in the street. We need to do something productive and positive." Kimani, 17

"Jobs not only teach useful skills, but how to be responsible with money. This summer, I learned how to open my own checking and savings account. Now, I can save for the future." Tymell, 16

Latest News

UNH responds to FY 15 State Budget

Monday, March 31, 2014

Although there remains tremendous unmet need in services for New York City’s children, youth, immigrants and older adults, United Neighborhood Houses is pleased that the NYS FY2015 budget includes several positive investments that will improve the lives of residents in vulnerable and low income communities. The investment of $300 million to make Universal Pre-K truly universal in New York City is a historic victory for New York City's children and families. In addition, the $34m expansion in the Child Care Block Grant (CCBG) will also help ensure that parents are able to go to work while their children are in safe settings. We are encouraged by the $5m increased investment in the Community Services for the Elderly (CSE) program which will allow greater numbers of older adults to age with dignity in their homes, and also applaud the $1m expansion to the Settlement House Initiative, which provides settlement houses with the flexibility to meet evolving community needs.

However, UNH is deeply disappointed in the failure of leadership that resulted in the DREAM Act not being included in the final budget. As a result, thousands of immigrant youth without documentation through no fault of their own will continue to face significant financial barriers to pursuing a higher education after succeeding in high school. This represents a missed opportunity for New York to capitalize on their talents and potential. In addition, by not investing greater resources in Adult Literacy Education (ALE) and the transition from the GED® to the Common Core-aligned TASC™ examination, immigrants seeking to improve their English skills, and other adult education students hoping to earn their high school equivalency diploma will continue to face class shortages.

Also of significant concern to UNH is the nominal increased investment in the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP). While the $2.5m increase will help retain some youth jobs, thousands more will be lost in NYC at a time when over 100,000 youth in the City are already turned from the program annually, as the State did not fully account for the impact of the increased minimum wage on the program.

Email Eling Tsai at etsai@unhny.org for more information.
www.unhny.org

Will Lawmakers Approve Funds for Summer Jobs?

Thursday, February 27, 2014

"Even though an increase in the minimum wage is a good thing for hard working families, it also means now we need even more money to keep the same amount of jobs," says Kevin Douglas, a policy analyst at United Neighborhood Houses and co-chair of the Campaign for Summer Jobs. "If we don’t get additional funding, there will be about 2,750 fewer jobs for teens."

image by TaxCredits.net

On January 28, Douglas and other advocates went to Albany with 250 teens to try to convince state legislators to approve a $35 million budget for SYEP, which would enable the program to employ the same number of youth as it did last year. The teens told legislators how having SYEP jobs in years past had helped them earn money for things like college applications and got them the work experience they needed to be hired elsewhere.

Read the full article here! 

Read more articles about the Campaign for Summer Jobs »

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