The UNH Blog

Disappointment over NY Senate Decision about the DREAM Act

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

United Neighborhood Houses is deeply disappointed that the New York Senate failed to pass the DREAM Act yesterday. Investing in the educational opportunity of youth eager to pursue higher education is a common sense move that states as diverse as Texas, California and New Mexico embraced years ago. At a time when immigrants drive New York City’s economy— comprising 44% of our workforce and generating over $210 billion in economic activity every year—shutting the door on the dreams of their children is shameful. UNH calls on Governor Cuomo, Speaker Silver and the Senate Leadership to include the DREAM Act in the final budget.



Blueprint for Neighborhoods

Friday, June 28, 2013

On Tuesday, UNH will release a new report, a “Blueprint for Neighborhoods” that outlines policy recommendations for the next Mayor that will help keep New York City  neighborhoods strong, stable and vibrant.   One of its key points is that the human services the government pays nonprofits to provide in communities across the city are as essential as other municipal services like police, fire and sanitation.  While these “uniformed services” are always included in Mayoral budgets and, in fact, often receive increases in their spending authorization, services that are equally important to community health and well-being, like child care, afterschool programs, English classes and senior centers, continue to be cut and continue to rely on reduced, unpredictable, often one-year funding.  This approach not only jeopardizes the stability of the nonprofit agencies the City relies on to deliver these services, it puts entire neighborhoods at risk.   

When New Yorkers turn on their light switches they expect the electricity to flow.  When they open their faucets, they expect the water to rush out.   These are utilities that we have come to count on.  Similarly, we need to provide “social utilities” to the many hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need predictable child care and senior care, to name but two.  When an older adult walks down the block,  she needs to know the doors of her senior center are still open.  When a young mother looks for affordable child care, she needs to know there will be a spot for her child in her neighborhood.   It is time to start treating these services as “discretionary”.  They are not.  Just like police and sanitation, they are part of what makes New York City a strong, stable and livable city.