The UNH Blog

"Best Budget for NYC's Neighborhoods in Years"

Monday, June 23, 2014

This is the best budget we have seen for New York City’s neighborhoods in years.  We applaud Mayor de Blasio and the City Council for preserving core neighborhood services and  for crucial new investments in the Summer Youth Employment Program, free school lunches for middle-schoolers, adult literacy education and the New York City Housing Authority.  However, there remain areas of unmet need and we need to go further.  We are disappointed that the budget does not include needed funding to provide adequate salaries for early childhood education staff. Without equitable salaries, qualified teachers  working with infants, toddlers and three year olds are likely to leave for higher paying jobs in Universal Pre-Kindergarten programs and thereby destabilizing services for younger children. UNH urges the City to work post budget to ensure that community based organizations  providing early childhood education are able to offer equitable salaries to their staff.

UNH's Applauds Governor Cuomo for Reinstating Funds to SNAP Benefits

Friday, February 28, 2014

United Neighborhood Houses is proud to work in a state in which the Governor has chosen to reinstate the deplorable Federal cuts to vital nutrition supports for low-income individuals and families. Governor Cuomo’s solution to provide the $457 million in SNAP benefits that were stripped from the Federal farm bill shows his commitment to the most vulnerable members of our communities. UNH member agencies see first-hand that hunger stands in the way of children learning, seniors remaining healthy, and of workers being productive; we are relieved to know that Governor Cuomo sees these realities too.

Blueprint for Neighborhoods

Friday, June 28, 2013

On Tuesday, UNH will release a new report, a “Blueprint for Neighborhoods” that outlines policy recommendations for the next Mayor that will help keep New York City  neighborhoods strong, stable and vibrant.   One of its key points is that the human services the government pays nonprofits to provide in communities across the city are as essential as other municipal services like police, fire and sanitation.  While these “uniformed services” are always included in Mayoral budgets and, in fact, often receive increases in their spending authorization, services that are equally important to community health and well-being, like child care, afterschool programs, English classes and senior centers, continue to be cut and continue to rely on reduced, unpredictable, often one-year funding.  This approach not only jeopardizes the stability of the nonprofit agencies the City relies on to deliver these services, it puts entire neighborhoods at risk.   

When New Yorkers turn on their light switches they expect the electricity to flow.  When they open their faucets, they expect the water to rush out.   These are utilities that we have come to count on.  Similarly, we need to provide “social utilities” to the many hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need predictable child care and senior care, to name but two.  When an older adult walks down the block,  she needs to know the doors of her senior center are still open.  When a young mother looks for affordable child care, she needs to know there will be a spot for her child in her neighborhood.   It is time to start treating these services as “discretionary”.  They are not.  Just like police and sanitation, they are part of what makes New York City a strong, stable and livable city.